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A Moon Base Can Be Used For... 

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#1 buoy

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 12:40 AM

Hi all,

Recently I've watched a few BBC Documentaries re the moon. Previous to this I really didn't think going to the moon was worth it - going to mars was the next logical goal. Perhaps the moon can allow us to "practice" - or at least that was my line of thought.

The documentary I watched (link here: http://www.youtube.c...AC0ZZxZC4#t=50m -- watch from 50 minutes onwards) talks about using the moon for practical applications such as energy collection and using the raw materials on the planet as a manufacturing base for things like rocket fuel, water and "fibreglass".

I also had the idea that to shield occupants for long space journeys, encasing the craft in many dozens of feet of water betwen the exterior and interior hulls would work quite well - except for the fact that it would take an enormous amount of fuel to get that water up there from earth.

Since the moon has 400 billion liters of water in the poles (apparently, refer to youtube link above) one use for that water, along with the ability to produce fiberglass from fabrication plants close by would be to create hulls filled with water and get these giant monolith tankers into space. Not only would they provide shielding from high energy rays but other tankers could be used in a life support role etc.


So, to recap. The moon appears to be a potential boon for doing everything else since we can most likley do the following:

- Manufacture more rocket fuel
- Manufacture more structural components
- Huge water reservoir
- Low gravity leads to more cost-effective launching of these huge reserves of water and other spacecraft
- Communications on the far side of the moon have less noise from earth (already the James Webb telescope is going to be positioned there for this very reason)
- No atmosphere allows solar array collection at almost 1.5x the energy conversion as that of earth. Constructing a lunar-based array of solar satellites "... would be cheaper than Earth-based materials for a system of as few as thirty Solar Power Satellites of 10GW capacity each." (source: "Lunar Resources Utilization for Space Construction" by General Dynamics' Convair Division, under NASA contract NAS9-15560 http://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntr..._1983077470.pdf )

#2 Rolled Cambers

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 12:46 AM

How about that conspiracy where the reason why they haven't been back is because of ET life/Warnings from them.

So scrap whatever you said above.

#3 buoy

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 01:24 AM

I think..... that conspiracy stuff....... is a load of bullshit dude :lol:

#4 Furi-S12

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 09:04 AM

id have to imagine the low gravity would be the biggest bonus for us, sure thered be alot of engineering issue to deal with for no gravity but im sure gravity causes enough issues thats theres a few things we could do there that we cant here or anywhere else with a decent gravity pull

#5 pman

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 09:56 AM

Gonna watch Pluto Nash for some ideas and get back to ya.

#6 skedy

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 10:07 AM

i loose bolts/nuts/tools all the time now imagine with less gravity... shit would float off all the time ahha

#7 EnFlaMEd

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 10:20 AM

Have a moon fap and do a really long range moon jizz while listening to this!




Obviously being able to collect resources and manufacture up there would be one of the biggest advantages due to not needing the huge amounts of fuels to move it from earth as you mentioned with your water idea.

Edited by EnFlaMEd, 22 January 2013 - 10:24 AM.


#8 EnFlaMEd

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 10:22 AM

View Postskedy, on 22 January 2013 - 10:07 AM, said:

i loose bolts/nuts/tools all the time now imagine with less gravity... shit would float off all the time ahha

http://youtu.be/1vXdRUIZ_EM

#9 Rolled Cambers

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 11:36 AM

View Postbuoy, on 22 January 2013 - 01:24 AM, said:

I think..... that conspiracy stuff....... is a load of bullshit dude :lol:

haha yeah I know. Just saying.

#10 Fire_Child22

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 09:15 PM

View PostRolled Cambers, on 22 January 2013 - 11:36 AM, said:

View Postbuoy, on 22 January 2013 - 01:24 AM, said:

I think..... that conspiracy stuff....... is a load of bullshit dude :lol:

haha yeah I know. Just saying.

just saying what?

#11 Lucas.

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 09:18 PM

Buoy. I would love to get in your mind after you've smoked a cone. I swear it be like a f**kibg Mexican entering America type scenario

#12 Rolled Cambers

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 09:20 PM

View PostFire_Child22, on 22 January 2013 - 09:15 PM, said:

View PostRolled Cambers, on 22 January 2013 - 11:36 AM, said:

View Postbuoy, on 22 January 2013 - 01:24 AM, said:

I think..... that conspiracy stuff....... is a load of bullshit dude :lol:

haha yeah I know. Just saying.

just saying what?

Posted Image

#13 GFUNK

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 12:53 PM

I didn't even know the was water on the moon, why don't we plant some trees etc? bad climate?



Also, I think buoy has graduated from Nissan Silvia... an eagle surrounded by turkeys

Edited by GFUNK, 23 January 2013 - 12:54 PM.


#14 -cj

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 02:24 PM

View PostGFUNK, on 23 January 2013 - 12:53 PM, said:

I didn't even know the was water on the moon, why don't we plant some trees etc? bad climate?


The moon is like -233c at night and 133c during the day plants would be f**ked haha
Also, I think buoy has graduated from Nissan Silvia... an eagle surrounded by turkeys


#15 Chappy

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 02:55 PM

Not to mention no atmosphere...

#16 Ntrnsk

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 03:57 PM

A launch site for further exploration into deeper space, with manned missions. Due to the much, much lower energy levels required to escape the grip of the moon's lower gravity, spaceship design could be improved to provide more storage for supplies and housing areas rather than the f**kload of space that is required right now in fuel just to get away from Earth. This would of course mean than that massive rocket we currently use would be mostly filled with things required to keep a crew (probably a much bigger crew than currently possible) alive and kicking for a trip to Mars for example.

Can't remember off the top of my head but I think the speed attained by the ship would be much higher than what we currently achieve with less 'weight' and no atmospheric resistance at launch.


#17 Ntrnsk

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 03:59 PM

And of course, low gravity f**king.

#18 buoy

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 04:06 PM

View PostLucas., on 22 January 2013 - 09:18 PM, said:

Buoy. I would love to get in your mind after you've smoked a cone. I swear it be like a f**kibg Mexican entering America type scenario
lol. I don't think it's very interesting in there. Might look like a lot of smoke and mirrors........


View PostGFUNK, on 23 January 2013 - 12:53 PM, said:

I didn't even know the was water on the moon, why don't we plant some trees etc? bad climate?
That would probably be a key thing for a moon base. Lots of trees and vegetation but it would be housed in a controlled environment inside an enclosure where atmosphere, temperature and pressure can be controlled and use the water reserves on the moon to irrigate. I have no idea how trees would go being planted in moon dust. I am guessing it would be similar to planting hydroponics - so planting shoots in sand - they'd still require nutrients and I'm guessing we'd have to bring that along :pika:



#19 -cj

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 04:34 PM

The moon has some atmosphere it's barely anything tho and the only thing in it is radon and helium

#20 Ntrnsk

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 07:35 AM

And would quickly lose most of the atmosphere that we created with trees/water due to the low gravity and the lack of magnetism to deflect solar flares that would otherwise strip the atmosphere as they came through.

So terraforming the moon would require us to be able to create a gigantic magnetic shield around the moon and increase it's gravity.

#21 pmod

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 09:01 AM

I'm surprised you wouldn't think the moon was useful, given the ISS had to be constructed in space, and it's tiny compared to the size of vessel needed to travel to Mars or similar.
Apart from the setup costs getting enough material to the moon to make it a self-sufficient entity, the main issues that would be faced are the initial setup of shielding for high energy particles, and the bone problems caused by prolonged exposure to a low-gravity environment.

The manufacturing benefits on the moon are obvious. Ignoring the resources, object manipulation would be far easier. For instance, on Earth I weigh 76kg, but on the moon I'd weigh around 12kg.

#22 ChiefStudly

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 09:51 AM

You may weigh less but essentially the moon would need to have the same gravity force as earth as we have evolved for that gravity. Astronauts that spend long amounts of time in space suffer from bone problems due to the lack of gravity which "compresses?" the bone structure minimalising the air cavities in the bone, as a result astronauts have brittle bones due to larger cavities in the bone make up due to lack of gravity. The moon has some gravity so the effects could be less but it is something to think about.

The moon is larger than most people think but if we do seem to colonise it and take up a large portion of the moon how would that affect earth? Would the structures on the moon effect the way the suns light reflect onto the earth? Or on a more dramatic scale perhaps somehow the colonisation could have push the moon farther away from the earth at a faster rate than it already is.


I know I kinda went left field on this topic but this is just my thoughts.

#23 Ntrnsk

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 10:01 AM

It would depend on how much weight we added, unless we're talking building New York style cities on there, I don't think we'd affect the Moons' overall mass too much. At least not enough to affect it's gravitational pull with Earth.

If we did though, the climate here on Earth would change dramatically, from wind patterns to sea levels, the size of waves etc etc. The moon would probably stop drifting away and start coming back to Earth..... which would be bad obviously..... :P

Since living on the moon would still require spacesuits, you could just weigh the spacesuits down to artificially create the same weight on the body as on Earth. At least til we build BioDomes!!!!

#24 blingcommander

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 10:13 AM

Posted Image

#25 Ntrnsk

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 10:16 AM

Lol, Blingy. Go the fricken laser beams

#26 Chappy

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 10:51 AM

The low gravity issue can be mitigated with regular stays on a space station that has artificial gravity.

If we were able to start up large scale manufacturing on the moon, we would be capable of making much larger space stations. Make one shaped like a donut then spin it at a high enough rate to simulate earths gravity.

#27 Flying180

  • Joined:29-March 05
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Posted 24 January 2013 - 07:44 PM

Coincidence?

http://www.news.com....c-1226561230468

Quote

SEEMINGLY not content to dig up our planet for its mineral resources, start-up company will start mining near-earth asteroids for its rock riches by 2015.
Deep Space Industries - launched yesterday - announced its plans to fly a small 25kg spacecraft called "Firefly" to an as-yet unidentified asteroid by 2015.

The spacecraft - which is said to be roughly the same size as a laptop - will begin to harvest metals and water within the decade, the company said.

"We can make amazing machines smaller, cheaper and faster than ever before," said Deep Space chairman Rick Tumlinson.

"Imagine a production line of Fireflies, cocked and loaded and ready to fly out to examine any object that gets near the Earth."

The venture could make it possible to build and or refuel spacecrafts above the surface of the planet, allowing space explorer's to spend longer in space exploring the universe.

"Using resources harvested in space is the only way to afford permanent space development," Deep Space CEO David Gump said at a press conference in California.

The company is already working on a second 32kg spacecraft called Dragonfly which is due to launch in 2016. Dragonfly will bring asteroids back to earth during two-to-four year missions to help the company determine the best places to mine.

Firefly will also be taking a 3D printer that works in zero gravity with it that is capable of printing super strong metal components. It is thought that the printed parts, along with the precious metals that will be extracted from the asteroids could be used to build communications satellites and solar powered space stations.

More than 900 new asteroids that pass by earth are discovered every year, Gump said.

"They can be like the Iron Range of Minnesota was for the Detroit car industry last century - a key resource located near where it was needed. In this case, metals and fuel from asteroids can expand the in-space industries of this century. That is our strategy."

Space boffins and amateur space fans alike will be able to track the spacecrafts progress via live feeds from Mission Control.

Deep Space is the second asteroid mining company of its time. The first - Planetary Resources - launched last April.



Read more: http://www.news.com....8#ixzz2It5OvUfJ


#28 Fire_Child22

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 08:22 PM

This is an awesome time to live in.. I just hope some of this shit happens on a scale we can appreciate it. I'd imagine the cost would be crazy high, then watch how they can do things cheaper and more efficient over time. Just hope I live long enough to see this all happen.

#29 Spazo

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 08:31 PM

Wouldn't it be easier to collect water from the north and south poles than sending a tanker all the way to the moon?

#30 buoy

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 10:32 PM

I think the moon is great. It's close enough for us to do some great stuff. It has basically no atmosphere (but as -cj pointed out it has a very tiny tiny atmosphere a trillionth of that compared to earths) which is advantageous for 1. direct sunlight for energy harvesting, 2. no corrosion 3. no atmospheric resistance for launching, 4. the low gravity is much easier to break away from so expending fuel would be so much less.... it has reserves of water in the poles and the moon surface raw materials can produce concrete TWICE as strong as that of earths (for some reason, just saw it in the above youtube vid I attached earlier).

it's just so convenient and awesome. it also has a dark side which completely masks out radio chatter from earth......





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