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    www.motul.com.au

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    Australia NSW
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    Nissan GTR
  1. What you want from a high performance racing oil? The modern engine designs of today need lubricants that can handle higher running temps to ensure viscosity consistency, while reducing consumption and oil film breakdown. Have you not noticed how modern engine run hotter? They are generally running 10-15deg C hotter or more when supercharged/ turbocharged. This is to improve combustion and reduce emissions. So how hot is hot when a car overheats? Enough to break down most oils and melt soft metal bearings, that’s how hot. Everyday oils are not able to handle excessive heat though and will reduce in viscosity by as much as 40% once it reaches 130 °C which means a 10w40 will perform like a 10w25. Motul’s high performance Ester synthetics are designed to handle higher temps without affecting the viscosity. High Performance engines always increase the load pressures placed upon moving components. High lift cams and stiffer valve springs load up the lifters, rocker arms and valve ends. Newer designs incorporate gear driven overhead cams which bring a new challenge. More internal gearing will shear the engine oil faster. High performance engines also need a balanced friction modifier package so that the ring seals stay strong, roller and ball bearings roll in the race and plain bearings have as little drag as possible. Because of this, Motul adds Extreme Pressure (EP) additives such as Zinc (ZDDP) and a STRONG EP additive, called a Sulfurized Ester to handle the shear/meshing of the engine. EP additives come into play at the instant an extreme pressure is applied and high temperatures are created. ZINC lays down a barrier that prevents metal to metal contact and the SULFURIZED ESTER produces a sacrificial film that is destroyed during very strong extreme pressures. The key advantage of Sulfurized Ester is that it prevents SEIZING. EP additives are generally corrosive especially those used in car gearboxes. The other advantage of Esters is that it is far less corrosive and more environmentally safe. Advertisements for oil products being tested with a ball bearing under 100,000 pounds of pressure fail to mention that most EP additives are corrosive. Performance engines used in endurance types of competition need strong ANTI-ACID (BASE, TBN, total base number). Condensation (the steam that you see coming out of your tail pipe in the morning) is a natural by-product of combustion in an engine. This condensation, which is acidic water, passes by the rings under compression into the crankcase and mixes with the sulphur, SULFURIC ACID is created. ANTI-ACID (Base) neutralizes the acid before it can cause any damage. E85 engines have it worse. E85 creates a greater acidic dilution than conventional ULP so look for a higher TBN is you run E85. High revving engines need strong Anti-Foam Additives. Higher RPMs aerates the oil more and bubbles will cause damage to your engine. Why? Foam is air; air will compress and also insulates. Air being compressed under load will separate oil and permit metal to metal contact. It also doesn’t transmit heat from hot metal parts to the oil very well or vice versa. Oil temp’s can rise due to inefficient heat exchange. Another major problem is oil pumps are not designed to pump air and your oil pressure will drop. Endurance engines need strong dispersants to suspend materials and combustion by-products which are created and rubbed off during normal operations. If you find worn components in your older race engine, ask yourself a question: Where did the material go? It has been compressed and the material is still there, just in a different place; or The materials were rubbed off and washed right into the oil! You want the material to stay in tiny pieces and stay mixed in the oil so that the oil filter can do its job. There are many devices on the market now that surround the filter with a magnet to capture some wear metals. Race engines need a strong detergent. With more heat generation (more horsepower per ci) trying to fry the oil onto the engine parts, carbon build-up and other by-products from combustion need to be washed away quickly so it doesn’t end up clogging the oil galleries. These are only some of the points Motul considers when designing high performance fluids. As discussed earlier, synthetics can handle much higher running temperatures than conventional petroleum oils and can withstand more stress. Many people ask, so what! I don’t push my vehicle that hard and I change oil every 3000kms. I don’t need expensive performance oil in my car. This type of thinking is wrong! Picture this; it’s a hot summer’s day and you are in peak hour traffic. For whatever reason, your car starts to get hot, real hot (Thermo fan stops working or a radiator hose breaks, whatever it may be). What oil would you like to have in your car? A mineral oil that acts like butter which burns up and evaporates very quickly, coking up your piston rings and lifters with carbon. Or Motul Synthetic/Ester oil that can handle super high RUNNING temps without the resulting damage (160°C to 190°C)? Motul High Performance Synthetic Ester oils are INSURANCE not just maintenance. The same is true about brake fluids and gear oils. Brake fluid only fails you when you need it the most – when braking! Same goes for engine oil. For further information regarding the Motul range, visit www.motul.com.au! Join us on FB https://www.facebook...323033041043007
  2. You may have heard over the years a lot of hype about Motul Oils. It might have seemed like a fad or passing faze to you at the time. You’re thinking it’s just another marketing spiel right?! 0% Shear Technology, Double Ester, Complex Ester, yeah, yeah, yeah. What can be so good about it? Well here’s a little known story from a user of Motul oils, GAS Motorsports. GAS Motorsports currently hold a number of world records including the Sport Compact record and fastest full bodied Toyota Supra. Their oil of choice: Motul 6100 Synergie. Not some secret formulation, but your standard, off the shelf 6100 15w50. The team had already had success using 6100 but here’s more of a reason why they would never use anything else other than Motul products. They have a new car in the team, the black Plumbmaster Scion. With an engine producing over 1600HP and gear shifts at 10,000RPM you get the idea that it would need the best engine oil for protection under this much stress. The car was still in the test’n’tune period in preparation for the Sydney Jamboree when it was being driven by Ben Bray at WSID in March 2012. After a few clean passes, the car was showing no signs of issues until the pass when it was paired with the GAS Motorsports Celica. A faint smoke trail followed the car from the 60ft line and got worse to the end. When the car got back to the pit area, the data logs were checked. It was every race team’s worst nightmare. Insufficient oil pressure for the majority of the run! A new car, a new engine and the last thing you want to go wrong is engine failure. The team was considering the possibility of having to replace the crank, all the bearings and con rods, adding up to excess of $15,000. See for yourself at the rotorg33k youtube channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/rotorg33k Have a look at the video titled: GAS 2JZ - Scion vs Celica Side by Side 650s - FLYBY! So, why did it lose oil pressure? The oil filter collapsed and restricted flow to the engine. Here’s is what it looked like when they removed it. With the oil pressure gauge showing as low as 0psi by the end of the pass, you can see that the filter would have been totally unforgiving to the oil supply by this time. Fearing the worst, the team pulled down the motor expecting to find all sorts internal damage. As they began to strip the engine they were astonished to find themselves having to search for damaged components. No signs of damage, not even a scratch or burr on the big end or main bearings! Now we’re talking a full power pass, 1600hp+ with little to no oil pressure and the only sign of failure is a collapsed oil filter. It’s unheard of! If you went to the Sydney Jamboree, you would have seen it back out there and competing with the same engine components still running the same consistent numbers! It really does go to show that Motul’s reputation is riding on its ability to protect your engine in cases just like this. Take it from the GAS Motorsports team, Motul protects your engine better than you’d ever expect. Countless cases like this prove that Motul is not expensive oil, its cheap insurance!
  3. Where to buy MOTUL

    No worries mitsumadness. Yeah, your right, Silly. Nevermind. Bigger and better things, we say! You might see Motul back on the shelves at Repco sooner than first thought. A couple of new products are on their way, one being a 5L for under $40! AND, it's looking like it will be the best in that price category. More on that when it's released. Ask 'When is the new Motul oil coming?' the next time you're in the shop looking for oil!
  4. Motul introduction

    WOY, as requested: http://www.hardtuned.net/forums/index.php?showtopic=517259 Hoping that is close to what you were after. You might still have some questions. Post 'em up in that thread and we'll be sure to answer them in good time.
  5. There are currently three ranges of gear oils available from Motul, grouped into their base quality. The 100% synthetic “Motul Gear” range comes in three variants, for different applications. Gear Competition – Offering the highest protection against wear Ability to resist shock High heat range to resist breakdown in harsh conditions such as track racing Proven by its use in the Mugen Le Mans 24Hr race car. Gear 300LS For high performance street use, with the ability to be used for occasional Motorsport events Best of both worlds – High protection and shock resistance, without the need for resistance against extreme conditions Gear 300 – Suitable for every day driving in high performance vehicles Offers the highest standard in protection of the mechanical components Long life Also available: GEAR FF LSD Type 2 (No picture at the moment) Nismo Competition Oil The Synthetic range, or “Technosyntheses” range – Suitable for use in most cars Best used in your every day car Offers high protection and long life Affordable cost for every day use Motyl Gear (75W90 & 75W80) For a better resistance at high temperature and longer life Suitable for all manual transmissions Synchronised or non synchronised gearboxes Multi ATF Suitable for all automatic transmissions except CVT transmissions. Long life Also available: Dexron III Gearbox 80w-90 Finally there is the Mineral range of gear oils – While technology advances to create superior oils for use in modern cars, they are often unsuitable for older engines and drive train components found in classic cars. This is because of the different materials used in older components, which can have unwanted reactions when in contact with additives contained in modern oils. The Motul mineral gear oils available are: 90PA Mineral lubricant specially formulated for limited-slip differentials (LSD) Suitable for racing cars Passenger cars 4WD Suits heavy vehicles such as Forestry and Construction vehicles Gear Oil90 Mineral lubricant for lightly loaded mechanical transmission Manual gearboxes and differentials Fully compatible with copper and bronze alloys Specially recommended for vintage or classic cars. GearV Castor oil based lubricant for screw and wheel rear differentials or crown made of bronze alloys Lubricant for lightly loaded manual transmissions and differentials Fully compatible with copper and bronze alloys There are some new products set for release, such as DEXRON VI and CVT Specific. More news on that when it happens.
  6. General technical resources

    No, no rebuttal. It might be all true what he was saying and if you owned a top fuel dragster, it might be just the right stuff. The best oil is not about how well each brand puts up an arguement as to why their product is better. It all comes down to what you, the consumer, wants and what you need it for. Maybe Motul is not for you, and then again, maybe it is. Who are we to say!
  7. General technical resources

    Sure thing. Ah, yes, the Koval EVO, Nulon sponsored test. KW figures can be improved slightly with a better oil than what you started with. It does this by reducing drag and friction allowing components to move more freely. Improved power shouldn't be what is solely desired as some oils drop in viscosity as the oil temp rises, where others don't drop as much. One thing to note is that most dyno operators will tell you power figures will change like that in the video without changing the oil. It is just how cars behave on dynos, temps change, tyre pressures change, oil temps change. There are a number of factors. Anyway,check this out - There's a few different languages spoken in that video, but I'm sure you get the idea. Where did you come across the comment of synthetics not recommended for pre-1995? Mazda won the SPA 24hr in 1981 using Motul synthetic oil... Here's another famous car from the early 80's. No synthetic oils in pre '95?? not true! But you do have to pick your oil to suit your needs. Older engines have bigger gaps between their bearings and need a thicker oil to take up that gap, newer engines are made really well and have small gaps between the bearings, which a thinner oil can be used. Mineral, semi or full synthetic, up to you. Just get the right viscosity. Then again, using a full synthetic in an old engine is like giving strawberries to a pig so keep it real while you're at it. Hope that helps make a bit more sense of it all.
  8. Where to buy MOTUL

    Heads up to anyone who prefers Repco over Autobarn! Repco has decided to take on Gulf Western oil and with the new kids on the block, someone had to go. Motul is off the shelves for now but still being stocked at the DC's and some stores and the entire range is available for order. So from now on, when you go into a Repco store, you gotta ask where is the Motul oils! Sorta like going into a video store and asking whats out back.... or a tobaconist and asking whats out back... or a car dealership and asking whats out back... All the best stuff is kept out back (Or under the counter depending on where you go)!
  9. Running in a new engine

    Some people have asked what the best oil to use for breaking in a new engine and most people don't know what the best way is to break in a new engine. To help with this one. Our advice is: The best oil to use is a mineral oil with lots of zinc or a 'break in' specific oil.* The best way to break in a new motor is to run it hard! The exact proceedure is outlined here on this site: http://www.mototuneusa.com/break_in_secrets.htm Once your motor has been run in, swap out the oil for your favourite Motul synthetic product and happy trails! *Sorry, there is a Motul Break-In oil, but available in the US only at the moment. Disclaimer: This is a suggestion only and you are to act at your discretion. What you do is your responsibility. You know the deal.
  10. General technical resources

    We should get Mythbusters onto that rumour. Most people don't know, but every oil filter has a pressure relief valve. If it didn't and the filter was blocked, it would burst at the seams! To say sludge caused an engine to seize might be true in the case of sludge blocking certain oil galleries. To say the detergent caused it by moving the sludge is pushing it. Motul uses additives to not only move the sediment, but break it down and suspend it in the oil so it does get filtered or removed on the next oil change. Here is a video on the Engine Flush product from Motul: Teflon scraping metal?? another tall story. It's a friction modifier, technically called PTFE. It stops metal scraping. That is Nulon's secret ingredient so I wouldn't go saying it scrapes metal! Here is a few links on PTFE: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polytetrafluoroethylene http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oil_additive http://youtu.be/zmxDectN56g
  11. Oil Groups - What are they and what do they mean.

    It has been mentioned on a few different forums that Motul uses esters from Bamboo... Just to clear it up. Its Coconut, not Bamboo. Who here likes the smell of 300V?
  12. General technical resources

    Hi TheApothecary, Some info to take into consideration; Every lubricant has a range of additives in it, like detergents and friction modifiers. Inidividually packaged additives assist only when the lubricant you are using lacks the qualities you need. Motul's 300V Factory Line 4T for motorcycles has an additive for wet clutches, which shouldn't be used in cars. Vice versa, don't use car 300V in a bike as it doesn't have the additives you need. Picking an oil with the additive package required, or for the purpose required is better than using seperate additives. Pro-Ma might work wonders for someone using K-mart oil in an old red motor, but not if you are using Motul 6100 in an RB. An oil with the additive package designed for that application doesn't need further additives.
  13. Motul introduction

    Thanks WOY, we're putting together some info on gear oil now and will post up soon.
  14. Trying to pick the right oil for your car? Can't work out what the hell API, ACEA, ILSAC and all the rest mean?? The manufacturer recommends genuine OEM oil, but can you use another oil? Here is a guide to give you a full understanding of what's what when you are looking for the right oil. Here's a few basics when it comes to lubricants: All will have the purpose for which it is intended (i.e. Motor oil, Gear oil etc) All will have the viscosity, like 10w40 or 15w50 etc for engine oils and 75w90 etc for gear oils Almost all will have the specifications that it meets, either or both API and ACEA ratings. 300V being one of the exclusions where it exceeds specifications. Some lubricants will also have OEM approvals that it carries and the codes (i.e. MB229.3, VW503.00, BMW LL01 etc) You might find Dexos1 or Dexos2 approved or Dexos2 Specific. Some may be OEM specific, as in the Motul Specific VW504-507 5W30. All oils are intended for an application and in general are not interchangeable. You would not for example put an Automatic Transmission Oil or a Gear Oil in your engine! It's important to know what the oil's intended purpose is. VISCOSITY Most oils on the shelves today are "Multigrades", which simply means that the oil falls into 2 viscosity grades (i.e. 10w-40 etc) Multigrades were first developed some 50 years ago to avoid the old routine of using a thinner oil in winter and a thicker oil in summer. In a 10w-40 for example the 10w bit (W = winter, not weight or watt or anything else for that matter) simply means that the oil must have a certain maximum viscosity/flow at low temperature. The lower the "W" number the better the oil's cold temperature/cold start performance. The 40 in a 10w-40 simply means that the oil must fall within certain viscosity limits at 100°C. This is a fixed limit and all oils that end in 40 must achieve these limits. Once again the lower the number, the thinner the oil: a 30 oil is thinner than a 40 oil at 100°C etc. Your handbook will specify whether a 30, 40 or 50 etc is required. SPECIFICATIONS Specifications are important as these indicate the performance of the oil and whether they have met or passed the latest tests, or whether the formulation is effectively obsolete or out of date. There are two specifications that you should look for on any oil bottle and these are API (American Petroleum Institute) and ACEA (Association des Constructeurs Europeens d'Automobiles) all good oils should contain both of these, and an understanding of what they mean is important. API This is the more basic as it is split (for passenger cars) into two catagories. S = Petrol and C = Diesel, most oils carry both petrol 'S' and diesel 'C' specifications. The following table shows how up to date the specifications the oil are: PETROL SN Introduced in October 2010 for 2011 and older vehicles, designed to provide improved high temperature deposit protection for pistons, more stringent sludge control, and seal compatibility. API SN with Resource Conserving matches ILSAC GF-5 by combining API SN performance with improved fuel economy, turbocharger protection, emission control system compatibility, and protection of engines operating on ethanol-containing fuels up to E85. SM Introduced on 30 November 2004. Category SM oils are designed to provide improved oxidation resistance, improved deposit protection, better wear protection, and better low-temperature performance over the life of the oil. Some SM oils may also meet the latest ILSAC specification and/or qualify as Energy Conserving. They may be used where API Service Category SJ and SL earlier categories are recommended. SL 2001 Gasoline Engine Service. Category SL was adopted to describe engine oils for use in 2001. It is for use in service typical of gasoline engines in present and earlier passenger cars, sports utility vehicles, vans and light trucks operating under vehicle manufacturers recommended maintenance procedures. Oils meeting API SL requirements have been tested according to the American Chemistry Council (ACC) Product Approval Code of Practice and may utilize the API Base Oil Interchange and Viscosity Grade Engine Testing Guidelines. They may be used where API Service Category SJ and earlier categories are recommended. SJ 1997 Gasoline Engine Service. Category SJ was adopted in 1996 to describe engine oil first mandated in 1997. It is for use in service typical of gasoline engines in present and earlier passenger cars, vans, and light trucks operating under manufacturers recommended maintenance procedures. Oils meeting API SH requirements have been tested according to the American Chemistry Council (ACC) Product Approval Code of Practice and may utilize the API Base Oil Interchange and Viscosity Grade Engine Testing Guidelines. They may be used where API Service Category SH and earlier categories are recommended. SH Obsolete For model year 1996 and older engines. SG Obsolete For model year 1993 and older engines. SF Obsolete For model year 1988 and older engines. SE Obsolete For model year 1979 and older engines. SD Obsolete For model year 1971 and older engines. SC Obsolete For model year 1967 and older engines. SB Obsolete For older engines. Use only when specifically recommended by the manufacturer. SA Obsolete For older engines; no performance requirement. Use only when specifically recommended by the manufacturer. Note: All specifications prior to SJ are now obsolete and, although suitable for some older vehicles, are more than 10 years old, and do not provide the same level of performance or protection as the more up to date SL, SM and SN specifications. DIESEL CJ-4 Current - 2006 Introduced in 2006 for high-speed four-stroke engines. Designed to meet 2007 on-highway exhaust emission standards. CJ-4 oils are compounded for use in all applications with diesel fuels ranging in sulphur content up to 500ppm (0.05% by weight). However, use of these oils with greater than 15ppm sulfur fuel may impact exhaust after treatment system durability and/or oil drain intervals. CJ-4 oils are effective at sustaining emission control system durability where particulate filters and other advanced after treatment systems are used. CJ-4 oils exceed the performance criteria of CF-4, C-4, AH-4 and C-4. CI-4 Plus Current - 2004 Used in conjunction with API C-4, the " CI-4 PLUS" designation identifies oils formulated to provide a higher level of protection against soot-related viscosity increase and viscosity loss due to shear in diesel engines. Like Energy Conserving, CI-4 PLUS appears in the lower portion of the API Service Symbol "Donut." CI-4 Severe-Duty Diesel Engine Service The CI-4 performance requirements describe oils for use in those high speed, four-stroke cycle diesel engines designed to meet 2004 exhaust emission standards, to be implemented October 2002. These oils are compounded for use in all applications with diesel fuels ranging in sulfur content up to 0.05% by weight. These oils are especially effective at sustaining engine durability where Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) and other exhaust emission componentry may be used. Optimum protection is provided for control of corrosive wear tendencies, low and high temperature stability, soot handling properties, piston deposit control, valve train wear, oxidative thickening, foaming and viscosity loss due to shear. CI-4 oils are superior in performance to those meeting API CH-4, CG-4 and CF-4 and can effectively lubricate engines calling for those API Service Categories. CH-4 Severe-Duty Diesel Engine Service This service oils are suitable for high speed, four-stroke diesel engines designed to meet 1998 exhaust emission standards and are specifically compounded for use with diesel fuels ranging in sulfur content up to 0.5% weight. CH-4 oils are superior in performance to those meeting API CF-4 and API CG-4 and can effectively lubricate engines calling for those API Service Categories. CG-4 Obsolete This category describes oils for use in high speed four-stroke-cycle diesel engines used in both heavy-duty on-highway (0.05% wt sulfur fuel) and off-highway (less than 0.5% wt sulfur fuel) applications. CG-4 oils provide effective control over high temperature piston deposits, wear, corrosion, foaming, oxidation stability, and soot accumulation. These oils are specially effective in engines designed to meet 1994 exhaust emission standards and may also be used in engines requiring API Service Categories CD, CE, and CF-4. Oils designed for this service have been in existence since 1994. CF-2 Obsolete Service typical of two-stroke cycle diesel engines requiring highly effective control over cylinder and ring-face scuffing and deposits. Oils designed for this service have been in existence since 1994 and may be used when API Service Category CD-II is recommended. These oils do not necessarily meet the requirements of API CF or CF-4 unless they pass the test requirements for these categories. CF Obsolete Service typical of indirect-injection diesel engines and other diesel engines that use a broad range of fuel types, including those using fuel with high sulfur content; for example, over 0.5% wt. Effective control of piston deposits, wear and copper-containing bearing corrosion is essential for these engines, which may be naturally aspirated, turbocharged or supercharged. Oils designated for this service have been in existence since 1994 and may be used when API Service Category CD is recommended. CF-4 Obsolete Service typical of high speed, four-stroke cycle diesel engines. API CF-4 oils exceed the requirements for the API CE category, providing improved control of oil consumption and piston deposits. These oils should be used in place of API CE oils. They are particularly suited for on-highway, heavy-duty truck applications. When combined with the appropriate S category, they can also be used in gasoline and diesel powered personal vehicles i.e., passenger cars, light trucks and vans when recommended by the vehicle or engine manufacturer. CE Obsolete Service typical of certain turbocharged or supercharged heavy-duty diesel engines, manufactured since 1983 and operated under both low speed, high load and high speed, high load conditions. Oils designed for this service may also be used when API Service Category CD is recommended. CD-II Obsolete Service typical of two-stroke cycle diesel engines requiring highly effective control of wear and deposits. Oils designed for this service also meet all performance requirements of API Service Category CD. CD Obsolete Service typical of certain naturally aspirated, turbocharged or supercharged diesel engines where highly effective control of wear and deposits is vital, or when using fuels with a wide quality range (including high-sulfur fuels). Oils designed for this service were introduced in 1955 and provide protection from high temperature deposits and bearing corrosion in these diesel engines. CC Obsolete Service typical of certain naturally aspirated, turbocharged or supercharged diesel engines operated in moderate to severe-duty service, and certain heavy-duty gasoline engines. Oils designed for this service provide protection from bearing corrosion, rust, corrosion and from high to low temperature deposits in gasoline engines. They were introduced in 1961. CB Obsolete Service typical of diesel engines operated in mild to moderate duty, but with lower quality fuels, which necessitate more protection from wear and deposits; occasionally has included gasoline engines in mild service. Oils designed for this service were introduced in 1949. They provide necessary protection from bearing corrosion and from high temperature deposits in naturally aspirated diesel engines with higher sulfur fuels. CA Obsolete Service typical of diesel engines operated in mild to moderate duty with high quality fuels; occasionally has included gasoline engines in mild service. Oils designed for this service provide protection from bearing corrosion and ring-belt deposits in some naturally aspirated diesel engines when using fuels of such quality that they impose no unusual requirements for wear and deposits protection. They were widely used in the 1940s and 1950s but should not be used in any engine unless specifically recommended by the equipment manufacturer. Note: All specifications prior to CH4 are now obsolete and, although suitable for some older vehicles, are more than 10 years old and do not provide the same level of performance or protection as the more up to date CH4 & CJ4 specifications. If you want a better more up to date oil specification then look for SL, SM, SN, CH4, CI4 and CJ4 ACEA This is the European equivalent of API (US) and is more specific in what the performance of the oil actually is. A = Petrol, B = Diesel and C = Catalyst compatible or low SAPS (Sulphated Ash, Phosphorus and Sulphur). Unlike API the ACEA specs are split into performance/application catagories as follows: A1 Fuel economy petrol A2 Standard performance level (now obsolete) A3 High performance and/or extended drain A4 Reserved for future use in certain direct injection engines A5 Combines A1 fuel economy with A3 performance B1 Fuel economy diesel B2 Standard performance level (now obsolete) B3 High performance and/or extended drain B4 For direct injection car diesel engines B5 Combines B1 fuel economy with B3/B4 performance C1-04 Petrol and Light duty Diesel engines, based on A5/B5-04 low SAPS, two way catalyst compatible. C2-04 Petrol and light duty Diesel engines, based on A5/B5-04 mid SAPS, two way catalyst compatible. C3-04 Petrol and light duty Diesel engines, based on A5/B5-04 mid SAPS, two way catalyst compatible, Higher performance levels due to higher HTHS. Note: SAPS = Sulphated Ash, Phosphorous and Sulphur. Technically speaking: A/B : Gasolene and Diesel engine oils A1/B1 Stable, stay-in-grade oil intended for use at extended drain intervals in gasoline engines and car & light van diesel engines specifically designed to be capable of using low friction low viscosity oils with a high temperature / high shear rate viscosity of 2.6 mPa*s for xW/20 and 2.9 to 3.5 mPa.s for all other viscosity grades. These oils are unsuitable for use in some engines. Consult owner manual or handbook if in doubt. A3/B3 Stable, stay-in-grade oil intended for use in high performance gasoline engines and car & light van diesel engines and/or for extended drain intervals where specified by the engine manufacturer, and/or for year-round use of low viscosity oils, and/or for severe operating conditions as defined by the engine manufacturer. A3/B4 Stable, stay-in-grade oil intended for use in high performance gasoline and direct injection diesel engines, but also suitable for applications described under A3/B3. A5/B5 Stable, stay-in-grade oil intended for use at extended drain intervals in high performance gasoline engines and car & light van diesel engines designed to be capable of using low friction low viscosity oils with a High temperature / High shear rate (HTHS) viscosity of 2.9 to 3.5 mPa.s. These oils are unsuitable for use in some engines. Consult owner manual or handbook if in doubt. C : Catalyst compatibility oils C1 Stable, stay-in-grade oil intended for use as catalyst compatible oil in vehicles with DPF and TWC in high performance car and light van diesel and gasoline engines requiring low friction, low viscosity, low SAPS oils with a minimum HTHS viscosity of 2.9 mPa.s. These oils will increase the DPF and TWC life and maintain the vehicles fuel economy. Warning: these oils have the lowest SAPS limits and are unsuitable for use in some engines. Consult owner manual or handbook if in doubt. C2 Stable, stay-in-grade oil intended for use as catalyst compatible oil in vehicles with DPF and TWC in high performance car and light van diesel and gasoline engines designed to be capable of using low friction, low viscosity oils with a minimum HTHS viscosity of 2.9mPa.s. These oils will increase the DPF and TWC life and maintain the vehicles fuel economy. Warning: these oils are unsuitable for use in some engines. Consult owner manual or handbook if in doubt. C3 Stable, stay-in-grade oil intended for use as catalyst compatible oil in vehicles with DPF and TWC in high performance car and light van diesel and gasoline engines, with a minimum HTHS viscosity of 3.5mPa.s. These oils will increase the DPF and TWC life. Warning: these oils are unsuitable for use in some engines. Consult owner manual or handbook if in doubt. C4 Stable, stay-in-grade oil intended for use as catalyst compatible oil in vehicles with DPF and TWC in high performance car and light van diesel and gasoline engines requiring low SAPS oil with a minimum HTHS viscosity of 3.5mPa.s. These oils will increase the DPF and TWC life. Warning: these oils are unsuitable for use in some engines. Consult owner manual or handbook if in doubt. E : Heavy Duty Diesel engine oils E4 Stable, stay-in-grade oil providing excellent control of piston cleanliness, wear, soot handling and lubricant stability. It is recommended for highly rated diesel engines meeting Euro I, Euro II, Euro III, Euro IV and Euro V emission requirements and running under very severe conditions, e.g. significantly extended oil drain intervals according to the manufacturer’s recommendations. It is suitable for engines without particulate filters, and for some EGR engines and some engines fitted with SCR NOx reduction systems. However, recommendations may differ between engine manufacturers so Driver Manuals and/or Dealers shall be consulted if in doubt. E6 Stable, stay-in-grade oil providing excellent control of piston cleanliness, wear, soot handling and lubricant stability. It is recommended for highly rated diesel engines meeting Euro I, Euro II, Euro III, Euro IV and Euro V emission requirements and running under very severe conditions, e.g. significantly extended oil drain intervals according to the manufacturer’s recommendations. It is suitable for EGR engines, with or without particulate filters, and for engines fitted with SCR NOx reduction systems. E6 quality is strongly recommended for engines fitted with particulate filters and is designed for use in combination with low sulphur diesel fuel. However, recommendations may differ between engine manufacturers so Driver Manuals and/or Dealers shall be consulted if in doubt. E7 Stable, stay-in-grade oil providing effective control with respect to piston cleanliness and bore polishing. It further provides excellent wear control, soot handling and lubricant stability. It is recommended for highly rated diesel engines meeting Euro I, Euro II, Euro III, Euro IV and Euro V emission requirements and running under severe conditions, e.g. extended oil drain intervals according to the manufacturer’s recommendations. It is suitable for engines without particulate filters, and for most EGR engines and most engines fitted with SCR NOx reduction systems. However, recommendations may differ between engine manufacturers so Driver Manuals and/or Dealers shall be consulted if in doubt. E9 Stable, stay-in-grade oil providing effective control with respect to piston cleanliness and bore polishing. It further provides excellent wear control, soot handling and lubricant stability. It is recommended for highly rated diesel engines meeting Euro I, Euro II, Euro III, Euro IV and Euro V emission requirements and running under severe conditions, e.g. extended oil drain intervals according to the manufacturer’s recommendations. It is suitable for engines with or without particulate filters, and for most EGR engines and for most engines fitted with SCR NOx reduction systems. E9 is strongly recommended for engines fitted with particulate filters and is designed for use in combination with low sulphur diesel fuel. However, recommendations may differ between engine manufacturers so Drivers Manuals and/or Dealers should be consulted if in doubt. Put simply, A3/B3, A5/B5 and C3 oils are the better quality, stay in grade performance oils. ILSAC Specifications ILSAC, International Lubricants Standardization and Approval Committee, is formed in 1992 by AAMA (American Automobile Manufacturers Association, representatives of DaimlerChrysler Corporation, Ford Motor Company and General Motors Corpo-ration) and JAMA (Japan Automobile Manufacturers Association) to define the need, parameters, licensing and administration of lubricant specifications. Together with the Tripartite system (API, SAE and ASTM) the formed EOLCS, the Engine Oil Licensing and Certification System. ILSAC oils often carry the API Service Symbol (Donut) including the Energy Conserving designation and/or API Certification Mark (Starburst). ILSAC GF-1 The ILSAC GF-1 standard indicates the oil meets both API SH and the Energy Conserving II (EC-II) requirements. It was created in 1990 and upgraded in 1992 and became the minimum requirement for oil used in American and Japanese automobiles. ILSAC GF-2 ILSAC GF-2 replaced GF-1 in 1996. The oil must meet both API SJ and EC-II requirements. The GF-2 standards requires 0W-30, 0W-40, 5W-20, 5W-30, 5W-40, 5W-50, 10W-30, 10W-40 and 10W-50 motor oils to meet stringent requirements for phosphorus content, low temperature operation, high temperature deposits and foam control. ILSAC GF-3 An ILSAC GF-3 an oil must meet both API SL and the EC-II requirements. The GF-3 standard has more stringent parameters regarding long-term effects of the oil on the vehicle emission system, improved fuel economy and improved volatility, deposit control and viscosity performance. The standard also requires less additive degradation and reduced oil consumption rates over the service life of the oil. ILSAC GF-4 ILSAC GF-4 is similar to the API SM service category, but it requires an additional sequence VIB Fuel Economy Test (ASTM D6837). ILSAC GF-5 Introduced in October 2010 for 2011 and older vehicles, designed to provide improved high temperature deposit protection for pistons and turbochargers, more stringent sludge control, improved fuel economy, enhanced emission control system compatibility, seal compatibility, and protection of engines operating on ethanol-containing fuels up to E85. DEXOS1 and DEXOS2 DEXOS2 is a new GM licenced product. For more information, go to their website DEXOS2 Worth noting, Motul have 2 products which are licenced globally. JASO is one you may never come across, but just in case you do... JASO oil specifications 2T specifications Japenese motorcycle manufacturers found the limits demanded by the API TC specifications too loose. Oils meeting the API TC standard still produced excessive smoke and could not prevent exhaust blocking. Therefore the Japanese Engine Oil Standards Implementaion Pansel (JASO) introduced the following specifications: JASO FA Original spec established regulating lubricity, detergency, initial torque, exhaust smoke and exhaust system blocking. JASO FB Increased lubricity, detergency, exhaust smoke and exhaust system blocking requirements over FA. JASO FC Lubricity and initial torque requirements same as FB, however far higher detergency, exhaust smoke and exhaust system blocking requirements over FB. JASO FD Same as FC with far higher detergency requirement. 4T specifications Modern passenger car engine oils contain more and more friction modifiers. While this is the good thing for those segments (reduces wear and fuel consumption) it's bad for the motorcycles. At least for those motorcycles which use engine oil to lubricate their transmission and wet clutch. JASO introduced the MA and MB specification to distinguish between friction modified and non friction modified engine oils. Most four-stroke motorcycles with wet clutches need a JASO MA oil. JASO MA Japanese standard for special oil which can be used in 4-stroke motorcycle engine with one oilsystem for engine, gearbox and wet clutchsystem. Fluid is non-friction modified. JASO MB MB grade oils are classified as the lowest friction oils among motorcycle four-cycle oils. Not to be used where a JASO MA grade oil is required. APPROVALS Many oils mention various OEM's on the bottle, the most common in the UK being VW, MB or BMW but do not be misled into thinking that you are buying a top oil because of this. Oil Companies send their oils to OEM's for approval however some older specs are easily achieved and can be done so with the cheapest of mineral oils. Newer specifications are always more up to date and better quality/performance than the older ones. Some of the older OEM specifications are listed here and depending on the performance level of your car are best ignored if you are looking for a quality high performance oil: Volkwagen Oil Approval Specifications Volkwagen introduced its own motor oil specifications in mid '90s. Since then this classification system is the starting point for selecting the technically suitable products for all vehicles manufacutred by the VW group (Volkswagen, Audi, Seat, Skoda). VW 500.00 Volkswagen specification for multigrade engine oils for gasoline engines with SAE 5W-X/10W-X viscosity. This is an "old" oil specification and is applicable to engines built before model year 2000 (up to August 1999). Oils with an approval made post March 1997 were given an alternative, later VW specification. VW 501.01 Conventional motor oils suitable for some VW engines built before MY 2000. This is an “old” oil specification and is applicable to engines built before model year 2000 (up to August 1999). Oils with an approval made post March 1997 were given an alternative, later VW specification. VW 502.00 Oil for gasoline engines. Successor of VW 501.01 and VW 500.00 specification. Recommended for those which are subject to arduous conditions. It must not be used for any engines with variable service intervals or any which are referred to under other specifications. VW 503.00 Long-life gasoline engine oil for VW cars with WIV (system for longer service intervals). Also meets ACEA A1, SAE 0W-30 or 5W-30 specification. VW 503.01 This specification is specifically for Audi RS4, Audi TT, S3 and Audi A8 6.0 V12 models with outputs of more than 180bhp, running with variable service intervals (30,000km or 2 years). Now superceded by the VW 504.00 specification. VW 504.00 The VW 504 00 specification supercedes the VW 503 00 and VW 503.01 specifications. VW 504 00 oils are suitable for engines meeting the demands of Euro IV emissions standards. VW 505.00 Passenger car diesel engine oil specification, minimum performance level CCMC PD-2. Lists viscosities SAE 5W-50, 10W-50/60, 15W-40/50, 20W-40/50 requiring 13% max. evaporation loss and SAE 5W-30/40, 10W-30/40 requiring 15% max. evaporation loss. VW 505.01 Special engine oil for VW turbodiesel engines with pump-injector-unit and for the V8 Commonrail turbodiesel engines. Meets ACEA B4 SAE 5W-40 specification. VW 506.00 These oils are suitable for diesel engines with extended service intervals of up to 50,000km / 2 years. Not for use on engines with a single injector pump. Oil change is indicated by the electronic service indicator. Viscosity is SAE 0W30. VW 506.01 These oils are especially for "Pumpe-Düse" (unit injector or "PD" engines) running on extended service intervals (30,000 - 50,000km / 24 months). Oil change is indicated by the electronic service indicator. VW 507.00 Low SAPS oils suitable for Euro 4 engines and almost all VAG diesel engines from 2000 onwards with extended service intervals, unitary injector pumps and also Pumpe-Düse ("PD") engines. Excludes V10, R5 engines and VW Commercial vehicles without fitted DPF (diesel particulate filters) – these must use a 506 01 specification oil. VW 508.00 This standard is not yet released. It will probably require a low SAPS oil with energy conserving properties. Mercedes Oil Approval Specifications The name of the MB specifications derives from the Mercedes Bluebook scheme, divided by numbered paragraphs and pages. It is used by dealers to identify the products certified by the manufacturer and their correct application on the engines. MB 229.1 For petrol and diesel engines. Minimum quality required ACEA A2/B2 with additional limits on engine. MB 229.3 For petrol and diesel engines. Minimum quality required ACEA A3 / B3 / B4 and MB 229.1. It can only certify 0/ 5 W-x oils. MB 229.31 Multigrade, low SPAsh engine oil, advised for both diesel and petrol engines of Mercedes Benz, Smart and Chrysler. Only low viscosity engine oils which can realize a 1,0% saving on used fuel in the M111 Fuel economy test (CEC L-54-T-96) can get this approval. In this test the fuel savings are compared to the performance of the Reference oil RL 191 (SAE 15W-40). MB 229.5 MB sheet for energy conserving oils for certain car and van engines. Approved oils must meet ACEA A3, B3 and B4 specification and some additional demands by Daimler Chrysler AG. Oil must be on the approval list. MB 229.51 Low SAPS Long Life engine oil for diesel engines with particle filter meeting emission EU-4 -> standards. BMW Oil Approval Specifications BMW Longlife-98 (LL98) Special long-life engine oil, approved by BMW. Also meets ACEA A3/B3, API SJ/CD, EC SAE 5W-40. Usually required for BMWs manufactured before MY 2002. BMW Longlife-01 (LL01) Special BMW approval for fully synthetic long-life oil. Product meets ACEA A3/B3 and API: SJ/CD EC-II. Usually required for BMWs built after MY 2002. Can also be used where a BMW Longlife-98 oil is recommended. BMW Longlife-04 (LL04) Special BMW approval for fully synthetic long-life oil. Viscosities are SAE 0W-30, 0W-40, 5W-30 and 5W-40. Usually required for BMWs equipped with a diesel particulate filter (DPF). Can also be used where a BMW Longlife-98 or BMW Longlife-01 oil is recommended. General Motors Oil Approval Specifications Motor Oils GM-LL-A-025 Special GM approval for long-life engine oil for gasoline engines. Viscosity is SAE 0W-30. Product meets ACEA A3/B3. Drain interval can be as long as 30 000 kms. GM-LL-B-025 Special GM approval for long-life engine oil for diesel engines. Viscosity is SAE 5W-40. Product meets ACEA A3/B3/B4. Drain interval can be as long as 50 000 kms. Automatic Transmission Fluids Dexron Type A, Suffix A Specification introduced in 1957. It requires the oil to meet certain limits regarding its kinematic viscosity. Dexron IID General Motors Dexron®-IID Specification. ATF issued in 1975. Contained ATF cooler corrosion requirements not listed in Dexron® - II. Dexron IIE General Motors Specification Dexron®-IIE. ATF issued in 1991 requiring improved low temperature performance compared to Dexron®-IID, 20 000 cP at minus 40 °C. Dexron IIIF GM specification for Automatic transmission oil introduced in 1994. Successor of Dexron IID and IIE. Dexron IIIG Successor of Dexron III(F) automatic transmission fluid. This has the same low temperature characteristics as Dexron IIE, but with modifications to anti-oxidancy and friction material. Introduced in 1997. Dexron IIIH Dexron III licence H was introduced in June 2003 to replace the Dexron III G fluid. It has an oxidatively stable base oil (group 2 or group 3). Oils according to this specification have longer maintenance of friction properties and anti-shrudder properties, better foam control and a longer fluid life. Dexron VI Specification introduced in 2005 to replace Dexron IIIH. This specification requires better stay-in-grade properties, oxidative stability and anti-foam characteristics. Oils meeting this specification can be used with extended drain intervals and are energy conserving. Ford Oil Approval Specifications Motor Oils Ford M2C913-A Engine oil, Initial and service fill, SAE 5W-30. This specification meets the ILSAC GF-2 and ACEA A1-98 and B1-98 and additional Ford requirements. Ford M2C913-B The Ford M2C913-B specification is released in Europe for initial fill engine oils used for lubrication of spark ignition engines using gasoline and for compression ignition engines using diesel fuels. The specification is also used to define engine oils for servicing Ford engines where applicable. The oil shall meet all the requirements of the ILSAC GF-2 and GF-3 specification, the ACEA A1-98 and B1-98 specification and additional Ford requirements. Ford M2C913-C Fully backwards compatible and is strongly recommended for all applications that currently require the specification Ford M2C913-B. The new engine oil provides various benefits to the customer such as improved fuel economy benefits and high robustness to biodiesel fuels. Ford M2C917-A Viscosity SAE 5W40 engine oil for pump injector diesel engines. Ford M2C934-A Extended drain engine oil for vehicles equipped with diesel particulate filter (DPF). Automatic Transmission Fluids Ford Mercon Automatic transmission fluid specification for use in Ford automatic transmissions. Forc Mercon V Ford Mercon V specification. An automatic transmission fluid with improved protection against rust, corrosion, deposits and wear. It improves low-temperature shifting and guards against transmission shudder. Mercon V is fully backwards compatible with Mercon. Fiat Oil Approval Specifications These qualifications define the characteristics to be complied with by the lubricants used in engines with Otto and Diesel cycle for the first time of filling and during service. The standard is formed of a series of tests in the laboratory and on the engine to assess the performance level of lubricants. The laboratory tests qualify the lubricant evaluating the viscosity, cold yield value, tendency to produce foam, corrosion on copper reed, behaviour with rubbers and resistance to oxidisation. The engine tests assess the performance levels of lubricants in terms of sticking rings, deposits on pistons, wear and also oil consumption of certain diesel and petrol engines which are the most representative of Fiat Auto’s most advanced technologies. Fiat 9.55535-G1 Qualification for gasoline engine lubricants granting fuel economy and extended drain. Fiat 9.55535-G2 Qualification for gasoline engine lubricants with standard characteristics. Fiat 9.55535-H2 Qualification for gasoline engine lubricants, granting high performances and high viscosity at high temperatures. OEM recommended product also meets API: SM, ACEA A3-04/B3-04. Fiat 9.55535-H3 Qualification for gasoline engine lubricants granting very high performances. Fiat 9.55535-D2 Qualification for Diesel engine lubricants with standard characteristics. Fiat 9.55535-M2 Qualification for lubricants with extended drain. OEM recommended product also meets ACEA B3-04/B4-04, GM-LL-B-025. Fiat 9.55535-N2 Qualification for lubricants with a very good characteristics for turbocharged engines, Diesel and gasoline, with extended drain. Minimum requirement is ACEA A3/B4-04. Fiat 9.55535-S1 Qualification for Diesel and gasoline engine, with exhaust treatment system, lubricants, granting fuel economy and extended drain. OEM recommended product is also approved to ACEA C2. Fiat 9.55535-S2 Qualification for Diesel and gasoline engine, with exhaust treatment system, lubricants, with extended drain. OEM recommended product also meets: ACEA C3-04, MB 229.51 and API: SM/CF. Renault Oil Specifications Renault RN0700 Renault engine oil specification; introduced in 2007 upon introduction of the Laguna III. General requirements: ACEA A3/B4 or ACEA A5/B5. Renault RN0710 Renault engine oil specification; introduced in 2007 upon introduction of the Laguna III. General requirements: ACEA A3/B4 + additional Renault demands. Renault RN 0720 Renault engine oil specification; introduced in 2007 upon introduction of the Laguna III. General requirements: ACEA C3 + additional Renault demands. RN0720 is designed for use in the latest generation diesel engines equipped with DPF. Peugeot-Citroën Oil Specifications The French PSA group issued a set of oil specifications in 2009 in order to exercise greater control over the motor oils used in their vehicles. All specifications are based on ACEA specs but also require further conditions to be met. PSA B71 2290 Peugeot/Citroën engine oil specification introduced in 2009. B71 2290 is a low-SAPS oil intended for engines with diesel particulate filters and with Euro 5 emission standards. General specifications are: ACEA C2 or C3 with additional PSA tests. PSA B71 2294 Peugeot/Citroën engine oil specification introduced in 2009. Main specification: ACEA A3/B4 with additional PSA tests. PSA B71 2295 Peugeot/Citroën engine oil standard for engine before MY 1998. General specification: ACEA A2/B2. PSA B71 2296 Peugeot/Citroën engine oil specification introduced in 2009. General specifications: ACEA A3/B4 + additional PSA tests. We hope this helps clear up any confusion when chosing the right lubricant. Credit to Simon on the Porsche 968 website for some of this information.
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