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Bazelinez

Tango Car - Electric!

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BEFORE you ask, yes, it will HOSE most cars on this site

 

The Tango is an ultra-narrow electric sports car initially designed and built by Commuter Cars, an American company based in Spokane, Washington, that sells this car worldwide.

 

Production of the first version, at a rate of about 100 cars per year, was set to begin in late 2005. It will be assembled by Prodrive in the United Kingdom. Actor George Clooney took delivery of the first Tango kit on August 9, 2005, which was a major milestone for the company. Clooney appeared in the press with the car, explaining and promoting it.

Contents

 

 

 

Overview

 

The Tango is thinner than some motorcycles and may be small enough to legally ride side-by-side with other small vehicles in traffic lanes in some jurisdictions. Capable of seating two passengers, though really designed for one, it only takes up one-quarter of a standard parking space and is able to park sideways in many cases. One prototype vehicle has been produced by the company and was shipped to Prodrive in January 2005, where the design will be duplicated for production models.

 

The first model will be the luxury Tango T600, costing roughly US$108,000. Premium features partially offset the high cost of the early kit vehicles, which are outfitted with a leather-lined interior and a hefty Nakamichi sound system. The T200 model is expected to be released in 2008 at $40,000, while the T100 is expected in 2009 with a $19,000 price tag.

 

While the vehicle looks top-heavy, it is fairly stable due to its heavy battery pack. About two-thirds of the 3,000+ lb (1360+ kg) curb weight in the prototype comparable to a standard sedan is taken up by the batteries, mounted low in the frame. Production models are expected to weigh less, ranging from 2,200 to 2,500 lb (1,000 to 1,130 kg). Propulsion is provided by two electric motors. To extend its range, the Tango can be attached to an optional Genset trailer [1]

 

Recharge

 

A dryer outlet will give most of a charge in an hour, or a full charge in less than 3 hours.With a 110-volt outlet it’s still easily charged overnight.With a 200-amp off-board charger, the Tango can be charged to 80% in about 10 minutes.

 

Specifications

 

* Width: 39 inches (~99 cm)

* Length: 101 inches (~257 cm)

* Weight: 3000+ lb (1360+ kg)

* 0 - 60 mph : 4 seconds

* ¼ mile (0.4 km): 12 seconds @ 120 mph (193 km/h)

* Top speed: 150 mph (240 km/h)

* Range: 80 miles (128 km) (Lead-acid batteries)

* Batteries: 12 V * 19 Hawker Odyssey's or 25 Exide Orbital XCD's or Optima Yellow Tops. Will accommodate Ni-MH and/or Li-Ion batteries in the future.

* Nominal Voltage: 228 V with 19 Hawkers (300 V with 25 batteries)

* Charging: 50 A on-board charger with Avcon conductive coupling. 200 A off-board charger under development.

* Motors: 2 Advanced DC Motors DC FB1-4001 9" [2], one driving each rear wheel with over 1,000 ft-lb of combined torque at low rpms. 8,000 rpm redline.

 

tango8.jpg

tango9.jpg

Edited by Bazelinez

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Its going to come down, its JUST been released, more a prototype exotic car atm.

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top speed of 240k's!!

i wouldnt feel safe in that at even 100

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haha thats heaps cool.

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It's only moments until Honda puts Asimo in it...HAHAHA. I can see it happening.

 

That thing is sick! As if park it next to a CRV! Talk about camparissons HAHA.

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It's about half the width of a 180sx and shorter, and it still weighs over 100kg more. Would be like a bullet hitting another car

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