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Spazo

Interesting article about warming up

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nice find, I always thought warm-up idling was relegated to old carburetted cars of yesteryear.

Edited by HumanHefner

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Good for standard engines. But not for built ones as not warnming them up can cause damage

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Nope. The quicker you get them to temperature the better.

 

Have you seen how they warm up f1 engines?

  • Upvote 1

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^ by pumping 80 degree coolent through the engine because they're seized when cold? Haha

I usually idle for about 10-15secs to get some oil pumping around before I take off, otherwise as soon as I put it in gear and touch the throttle the vct makes a noise haha

Edited by Coastie

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yep once you've got oil pressure which takes mere seconds you are good to go. I don't hammer it until it reaches operating temp and the thermostat opens though.

 

I just bit the bullet and bought a new vct gear from taarks. Ive been over that tractor noise for awhile now even though it's only a as coastie said for a second when u start it and put it in gear I'm fuggin over it.

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Good for standard engines. But not for built ones as not warnming them up can cause damage

 

Yeah the engine builder (for my s15) told me to warm it up for a few mins.

 

Well this is good, means I can take off sooner (in my mazda).

Edited by Spazo

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Good for standard engines. But not for built ones as not warnming them up can cause damage

 

Yeah the engine builder (for my s15) told me to warm it up for a few mins.

 

Well this is good, means I can take off sooner (in my mazda).

I was told by the guy that did my engine was warm it up to 80deg before driving it

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Geeze. Thats def no good. Sitting there idling just pumps the fuel into the cylinders. You want to stop that as soon as you can. The car warms up quicker under load.

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I assumed loading it up while it was cold was the bad thing.

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You don't have to load it up to drive. Just drive the thing. My old tafe teachers always said best way to warm a car up is to just drive it. Cos then you're warming up diff/gearbox oil at the same time.

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I remember reading a owners manual which if I remember correctly was from a Statesman but in it said to not allow the car to idle but to start driving asap from start up.

 

I didn't pay attention to it as for all these years I have had the idea in my head that idling a car was more beneficial for a engine rather then puling out the drive way directly after start up.

 

Its going to be hard to except and a weird feeling to just start driving directly after start up.

  • Downvote 1

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Gotta admit I usually have the car idelling for about 5 mins before I drive it. Usually takes that long to move all the crap that's sitting behind it in the garage lol.

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Just farking hit the anti lag 2 step launch control. Shit will be warm in no time! POW POW POW..

 

Okay don't take that advice literally

 

Just start and drive straight but just take it easy.

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Just start and drive straight but just take it easy.

 

Yeah, this mostly.

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Once saw a P plater take off in an old Mazda Capella by instantly transitioning from engine cranking to 7000rpm to dropped clutch. He thought the blue smoke was coming from his tyres, but I knew better.

Edited by stockblues15

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Conversely, it's pointless giving a f**k about warm up procedures when the engine's already f**ked!

 

One thing that annoys me is how some people think RPMs kill engines at cold temps, then proceed to mash the throttle at low RPMs right in the torque peak. Jesus.

Edited by Skepticism

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Another factor I have heard of is that the piston rings rely on pressure differential between the cylinder and block to drag against the cylinder wall and do their job properly wiping oil down. This doesn't happen at low rpm.

Edited by Luckytune

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My Morning routine:

 

Get up

Get changed

Open Garage

Get in car

start car

drive straight away - ain't got time to sit there and let the car warm up! F That!

 

Just drive the bloody car.

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As previously said, just drive off. Take it easy until the temp gauge is at or close to running temp.

 

Excessive idling can cause petrol to run down the sides of the cylinder and mix with your motor oil.

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Roll with what your engine builder has told you to do. Forged pistons tend to be harder and take longer to expand/fill the cylinder. If you load it up too much, it might slap the cylinder wall a bit much and ruin your crosshatch/cause ovalling (not sure if that's a word?).

 

Excessive idling can cause petrol to run down the sides of the cylinder and mix with your motor oil.

 

Not usually from idling? More from incorrect AFR's and too much fuel in the cylinder not burning? Might not happen as much in a hot engine because the walls are too warm and the fuel vaporises upon impact, but if it's bypassing the rings, you've probably got some issues elsewhere.

 

Having said that, you're right that people should avoid excessive idling. Car engines aren't designed for that.

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chappy, your profile pic triggers me so hard

 

:lol:

 

triggered.jpg?w=320&h=371

 

Roll with what your engine builder has told you to do. Forged pistons tend to be harder and take longer to expand/fill the cylinder. If you load it up too much, it might slap the cylinder wall a bit much and ruin your crosshatch/cause ovalling (not sure if that's a word?).

 

Nobody is saying you should redline your car straight out of the driveway. Simply taking it easy until your engine has warmed up is all you need to do.

Excessive idling can cause petrol to run down the sides of the cylinder and mix with your motor oil.
Not usually from idling? More from incorrect AFR's and too much fuel in the cylinder not burning? Might not happen as much in a hot engine because the walls are too warm and the fuel vaporises upon impact, but if it's bypassing the rings, you've probably got some issues elsewhere. Having said that, you're right that people should avoid excessive idling. Car engines aren't designed for that.

 

Piston rings are not a perfect seal, unburnt fuel vapour can make it past and condense on the other side.

Many engines will run quite rich on a cold start. The fuel smell my stock V36 makes when i first start it up is enough to make you high.

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