Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
STR8E180

CAD SOFTWARE

Recommended Posts

I know there are some machinist on here

 

I'm looking for a easy to use CAD program

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If just CAD your looking for, my favorite is designCAD. I have used autoCAD a fair bit but never really liked it. AutoCAD is probably the most widely used program i've seen in my area.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

solidworks has gotta be the easiest ive used by fa

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know there are some machinist on here

 

I'm looking for a easy to use CAD program

 

 

For what uses? 3D? 2D?

 

I'm currently teaching myself to use autocad via youtube videos :lol: , seems pretty straight forward. But inventor is probably the easiest to use for 3D stuff, which is what we use for all our 3- axis CNC work. We also use fastcam for all our plasma design work which is dead basic and simple to use, but really isnt good enough for more detailed work I have found, but perfect for drawing up basic shapes and stuff to cut on the plasma. We use a few different programs here and they all have the good points and downfalls.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We use autocad for 2D drawings and Delcam powershape/powermill software for all our 3D cnc machining. Autocad would probably be the biggest CAD software available. Pretty easy to use too. As above... just teach yourself from youtube

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use SolidWorks for uni. So far its been pretty simple to learn.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i can sorta use Cad just picked it up by plaing around trying things and found it fairly easy to pick up, mainly for building construction work, but i'd love to have a go at solid works and some of the 3d modelling programs

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use SolidWorks for uni. So far its been pretty simple to learn.

Can you grab me a copy? If your a uni student you get it cheaper (or free.....) . Obviously I don't go to uni. lol

 

 

i can get you a copy for free from uni but its the lisences that cost (were talking 1000 bucks). but im sure some searching could bring up a 'lisence' for it

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Autocad LT or Autocad 200X will be ok or Auto sketch is ok as well.. then there is turbocad,all are pretty easy to use it just depends on what you are drawing 2d or 3d then there is solid works all can be downloaded from torrents and with a little bit of patience you will learn. Or you can ask, youtube, ebooks etc..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Autocad is for 2d shit, I used it all the time and it is pretty easy. I used unigraphics at uni, now teaching my self Inventor to do some 3D stuff, not that hard either. Google and youtube videos are your friend!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

...Auto cad is the most widely used program. it has its glitches like any program. And its not shit. Apart from the the only program that betters it is Turbo CAD as chris2712 has pointed out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Autocad is for 2d shit, I used it all the time and it is pretty easy. I used unigraphics at uni, now teaching my self Inventor to do som e 3D stuff, not that hard either. Google and youtube videos are your friend!

 

Lt = 2d Full version is 3d.. use do kitchens in autocad in 3d.. however Cad has moved in leaps and bounds since these and that there are specific apps that have been solved with software like chief architect for building / interior design, solid edge and others for part design and part modeling some can even do airflow calcs, we used solid edge on a CNC machine it was more of a CAM.. but I would say that auto cad is harder to use in 3d than others I have played with in terms of rendering but they are all the same in terms of 2d.. polar / vector or point to point blah blah... but it is the customisations that make it easy to use AKA toolboxes.. otherwise just use visio from m.s. but that has tolboxes too.. then there is fonts and making it look prety.. and thats another thing that autocad does not deliver..

 

Taark seems to do a fair bit of cad/cam.. and is stuff looks the goods.. so if thats what you are after talk to him..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use Rhino, its really good for curve surfaces such as composite/carbon fibre parts. Its got an addon called RhinoCAM which can toolpath 2D, 3D and 5 axis machining straight from the CAD file. Rhino's pretty hard to use tho, its popular with industrial designers because you can draw very complex shapes.

 

Solidworks and Pro-E are easier to use but they are parametric based and in my experience the blends aren't as nice so the parts are more "blocky". Commercial licenses for Solidworks cost upwards of $20k so unless you can find a "special" license :)

 

Probably best to start with Solidworks. Don't bother with AutoCAD, its so old fashion you'll think you're back in the 80's with dot-matrix printers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

il be doing 3d work

 

i wont ever be using it for CNC work basically just want to blue print designs B4 starting work instead of going of the top of my head

 

wat would u recommend for 3D work?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Try google sketchup man it's free so at least you can give it a shot before forking out for inventor.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

il be doing 3d work

 

i wont ever be using it for CNC work basically just want to blue print designs B4 starting work instead of going of the top of my head

 

wat would u recommend for 3D work?

 

Inventor

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use a fair bit of 3d programs and cad programs. By far the easiest 3d program is google sketch up. The Autodesk programs can take a while to learn (3ds max, inventor etc) but are far more powerful with what they can do.

 

If you are only after reasonably simple 3d modeling then i suggest sketchup.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use Siemens NX at uni and at work but I'd recommend Solidworks. :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I recommend Solidworks over AutoCAD for parts modelling, i used to model drill rigs with Solidworks and it was very straight forward.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

will b using it mostly for manifolds and that sort of stuff

 

instead of picturing it in my head and going of the top of my head i want to start drawing it

makes it easier to work out new designs and to see if they will work or not

 

out of all the programs out there which one would u recommend for stuff like this

 

must be easy to use

 

111.jpg

 

rb25ttsetup.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used rhino and pro-engineer at uni. Forget rhino for production, i found it more of a conceptual program and not really accurate, works really well for creating organic shapes and surfaces though. Pro-e was f**king hard to use and is more suited for designing parts and sending them for production than rhino, but i also think its pretty expensive.

 

When I went into the industry, I was using a program called solid edge. I found this better than rhino and pro-e. It was much easier to use. I was using it for sheet metal part design and some solid parts, really easy to switch between the two as well. I think it was about $4000 per year for two licences.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

for modeling exhausts in Solidworks you would just create a whole load of sections and put them together in an assembly just as you would when fabricating it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Try google sketch up. For concept designs like that its the easiest and by far the quickest one to use, and its free. I use it at work when i cant be bothered firing up Inventor.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

for modeling exhausts in Solidworks you would just create a whole load of sections and put them together in an assembly just as you would when fabricating it.

yep thats exactly wat i want to do

 

+ solidworks

did a tafe course learning how to use it!

really straight forward and has some good tutorials!

wat course is it called at tafe?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×