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Skepticism

Seems like DIY carbon fibre might be a reality soon.

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no doubt some company like Koenigsegg will develop a massive version of this, imagine printing out an entire chassis

Edited by HumanHefner

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only a matter of time till it gets bigger and badder.

 

you'll pay out the arse for a whole machine but renting would be cheaper.

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I have used this stuff with fibreglass resin, its good for things like mounting tweeters and stuff, it comes up pretty nice if done properly.

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The way they described the carbon fiber how it is laid will have no strength at all. I know this because I work with it daily carbon is the same as fiberglass it needs to be woven and have multiple layers. This just seems like a gimmick to me.

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sorry ^ ment to add a photo, The stuff I'm talking about comes in cloth form, and its all woven together like carbon fibre should be then you add resin, it dries super hard it is alot stronger than fibreglass. I dunno if its realy because of how cheap it is, but it sure looks the same, and is equally as strong imo. But seriously whats the point in carbon fibre when the rest of your car is a commodore lol.

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Just to add more fuel to the topic http://www.wired.com/autopia/2014/03/edag-3-d-printed-car/

 

"The assembly line isn’t going away, but 3-D printing is going to reshape how we make cars. The EDAG Genesis points the way, with an beautifully crafted frame made from a range of materials and inspired by a turtle’s skeleton.

The German engineering firm showed off the Genesis design concept at the Geneva Motor Show as proof that additive manufacturing–EDAG’s fancy term for 3-D printing–can be used to make full-size car components. It’s on an entirely different scale than the tiny, 3-D printed creations coming out of a desktop Makerbot, but it’s also just a frame–a stylized chassis that’s more art than reality.

Before settling on 3-D printing, EDAG tried a few different acronym-heavy options, including selective laser sintering (SLS), selective laser melting (SLM), and stereolithography (SLA). But after extensive tinkering, the final process they used was a modified version of fused-deposition modeling, or FDM.

EDAG’s robot built the Genesis concept by creating a thermoplastic model of the complex interior, although the company says they could use carbon fiber to make the structure both stronger and lighter. EDAG envisions the Genesis as being surrounded by an exterior frame–likely steel or aluminum–to provide a tough exterior to protect the lattice-like monocoque."

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